Historical Architecture of Grosse Pointe – The Tudor Work of Omer C. Bouschor – Part 1

As is the case with so many prolific architects who created homes in Grosse Pointe, it can be difficult to find information about them professionally and/or personally. This is no reflection on their skills as a designer, but attributed to the number of highly skilled architects who have worked in this area. We are spoilt for choice and it will no doubt take many more years to uncover the many projects that these lesser known, yet highly talented designers created.

This week we present an architect who certainly fits into this category – Omer C. Bouschor. During his career, this Detroit based architect created well over 29 homes in the community – more than many other architects.

Given the number of exquisite homes he has created we felt it was important to showcase this talent, depth and wide-ranging ability to evolve his style based on the architectural trends of the particular era.

What we do know is Omer C. Bouschor’s career (in Grosse Pointe) almost seems to have been divided into two halves – his work pre 1940 and post 1940. There was a distinct shift in his style – from – his Tudor Revival homes of the 1930’s, through to the modern colonial homes he created between 1935 and 1954.

Part 1 of our posts on the homes of Omer C. Bouschor begins with the 14 Tudor Revival inspired homes he created in Grosse Pointe between 1934 and 1941. The majority of these homes are located in Grosse Pointe Park, and it is clear from the design of these homes that Bouschor, at this point in his career, was largely influenced by this approach.

At its height of popularity in the 1920’s, the Tudor Revival style required skill by the architect to reproduce the typical characteristics in the right proportions to create the charm associated with this style. Bouschor was incredibly skilled in designing homes in the Tudor style, and it becomes fairly easy to recognize his superb work, as the following photos will highlight.

1934
752 Barrington

Possibly one of his earliest homes in the Pointes and probably his smallest, this 1,262 sq ft brick residence is charming.

752_barrington

752 Barrington

1935

946 Balfour

This is one of his earlier characteristic Tudor homes to incorporate the distinctive timbered section on the second floor. The 4,850 sq ft house features magnificent detailing inside and out. The interior includes gumwood paneling in the library, a large living room (28’ x 17’ sq ft) with a bay window and a large natural fireplace, along with a beautiful stained glass window on the second floor visible on the front elevation below.

946_balfour

946 Balfour

828 Berkshire

828-berkshire

828 Berkshire

1052 Devonshire

Keeping with the style from the design of 946 Balfour, this elegant Tudor home is constructed from brick with a classic use of stone detailing on the chimney and around the windows.

1052_devonshire

1052 Devonshire

1258 Yorkshire

1258_yorkshire

1258 Yorkshire

15621 Windmill Pointe Drive

15621_windmill-pointe

15621 Windmill Pointe Drive

1936
631 Pemberton

631_pemberton

631 Pemberton

1937
154 Touraine

154_touraine

154 Touraine

1265 Buckingham

1265-buckingham

1265 Buckingham

719 Berkshire

719_berkshire

719 Berkshire

1938
77 Oxford

77_oxford

77 Oxford

1940
766 Berkshire

766-berkshire

766 Berkshire

1941
715 Berkshire

715-berkshire

715 Berkshire

1950
73 Sunningdale
This appears to be one of the last homes he created in the community. At this point in time of his career he had moved away from working primarily in Grosse Pointe Park and was more predominantly in the Farms and the Shores. Although he had primarily switched to a modern colonial style this 5,168 sq ft home appears to be one of the last designs he created with the Tudor approach.

73-sunningdale

73 Sunningdale

It is clear from the examples of his work, Omer C. Bouschor was a master of the Tudor style. Not only did he employ all the typical elements in the correct proportions, with exquisite detailing, it is clear he had fun incorporating the grand chimneys, many of which display superb brickwork and are the key feature to many of his homes.

Next week we will feature the second part of Omer C. Bouschor’s rather constructive career ‘the colonial homes’ from 1936 – 1954.

 

Written by Katie Doelle
Copyright © 2016 Higbie Maxon Agney

 

If you have a home, building or street you would like us to profile please contact Darby Moran – Darby@higbiemaxon.com – we will try and feature the property.

(For more historical information on Grosse Pointe, visit Grosse Pointe Historical Society).