Historical Architecture of Grosse Pointe – The Old and the New: Sunningdale – Part 2

When you drive up a road in Grosse Pointe, frequently you cant help but stop and look at the houses on display. One day, having been driving around the Pointes, we found ourselves on Sunningdale Drive. Aside from the pristine gardens on display the diversity of the architecture captured our attention.

While it was obvious some homes are much older than others, it also quickly became apparent the newer houses on the street had been designed to respect their ‘elderly’ neighbors.

Assembling a collection of architectural styles is never easy – arguably homes constructed during the past 30 years do not resemble the homes from a by-gone era – namely the 1920’s and 1930’s. However, there are exceptions, which is evident in the modern constructions on this street.

Welcome to part two of our presentation on Sunningdale. Last week we covered the homes completed before 1940, this week we turn our attention to the later creations.

Lets start with number 717. This is the second home on the street by distinguished architect Marcus Burrows. Having completed number 942 in 1926, this 2,960 sq ft clapboard colonial house is a significant departure from Burrows typical brick built English Revival Style residences. It is a particularly striking house with the four dominant porticos on the front elevation and the delicate arches below the roofline. It not only demonstrates Burrows diversity as an architect but the streets evolving architectural style.

717 Sunningdale

Number 87 was completed in 1942 and is a pretty Cape Cod style home. The Cape Cod Style is present throughout the Pointes and became increasing popular during the 1940’s and onwards.

87 Sunningdale

In 1949, the ever-prolific builder Hilary Micou created number 60.

60 Sunningdale

1950 saw the superb Omer Bouschor complete two homes on Sunningdale – number 67 and 73. During his career, Bouschor, a Detroit based architect, created well over 29 homes in the community with at least 14 houses in the Tudor revival style. Bouschor was incredibly skilled in designing homes in the Tudor style, and his work is fairly recognizable.

Number 73 displays the typical characteristics associated with this approach. This 5,168 sq ft home appears to be one of the last Tudor homes Bouschor created in the community, and having spent a significant part of his career creating large Tudor homes in Grosse Pointe Park, he was now working on more projects in the Farms and the Shores.

73 Sunningdale

His work at number 67 is more in keeping with the modern colonial approach Bouschor employed on many of his projects during the latter part of his career. Post 1940, it is clear he adapted his style to the ever-evolving trends – you can read the full story of Omer Bouschor by visiting Part 1 and Part 2.

67 Sunningdale

Robert B. Wood designed number 839 in 1952. The 3,216 sq ft residence has been described as a New Orleans Ranch style home. The photo below displays the very unique garage doors and the decorative element above the front door. The 1950’s were a very popular time in Grosse Pointe for the construction of ranch homes throughout the community, with some wonderful examples of ranch homes on Stephens Road – please click here to learn more.

839 Sunningdale

Number 799 was designed by prolific Grosse Pointe architect Walter Mast in 1953. Mast designed well over fifty homes in the community over a period of around 30 years, spanning from the 1930’s through to the late 1960’s. His design for this 3,365 sq ft ranch house is in keeping with many homes in the community during this era.

Finally we jump to 2003 and house number 46. Given that it was built in the 21st century it displays all the hallmarks of a grand 1920’s Grosse Pointe home. The detailing on this 6,200 sq ft home is superb, inside and out, featuring high ceilings, a grand staircase, a wood paneled library and decorative architectural elements throughout. This house is for sale – you can view the full details by clicking here.

46 Sunningdale

The homes on Sunningdale provide us with fabulous insight into what happens when two architectural worlds collide – the old and the new. From 1926, and concluding with a property built in the 21st century, the architectural styles on display cover a broad spectrum, without a sense of awkwardness or feeling out of place.

 

Written by Katie Doelle
Copyright © 2017 Higbie Maxon Agney & Katie Doelle

 

If you have a home, building or street you would like us to profile please contact Darby Moran – Darby@higbiemaxon.com – we will try and feature the property.

(For more historical information on Grosse Pointe, visit Grosse Pointe Historical Society).