Historical Architecture of Grosse Pointe – Architect – Marcus Burrowes

MBurrowesLet us introduce you to Detroit architect Marcus Burrowes. Burrowes was a versatile artist, designing residential, public and municipal buildings in and near Detroit. During the 1920’s and 1930’s Burrowes was widely known throughout southeast Michigan for his English Revival Style buildings, a style he also brought to the Grosse Pointe communities as part of the eight buildings (that we know of) he designed here.

Marcus R. Burrowes was born in Tonawanda, N.Y near Buffalo in 1874. He attended the Denver Art Academy, studying with architects of note as well as serving an apprenticeship to a prominent architectural firm in Denver.

In 1892 Burrowes moved to Ottawa, Canada to work in the chief architects office, specializing in post office buildings. During his time there he also created several public buildings in Sarnia. It wasn’t long before, Burrowes ambitions prompted him move across the river to Detroit, which at the time was where some of the best architectural talent in Michigan could be found.

Around 1905 Burrowes got the opportunity to work in the offices of Albert Kahn. In 1907 he joined noted architectural firm Stratton and Baldwin (already prominent designers in Grosse Pointe) where he stayed for two years. During his time with the firm he would meet many leading figures in the Arts and Crafts movement in Detroit, including Kahn, William B Stratton, Frank C. Baldwin and George Booth. Through his relationship with Stratton, Burrowes also made an important connection with Mary Chase Stratton of Pewabic Pottery – his launching pad into the Detroit Architectural Scene was complete.

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Historical Architecture of Grosse Pointe – Architect Leonard B. Willeke and his work in Grosse Pointe Park – Part 2.

Historical Architecture of Grosse Pointe – Architect Leonard B. Willeke and his work in Grosse Pointe Park – Part 2.

Last week we profiled one of the unsung hero’s of architecture in Grosse Pointe, Leonard B. Willeke – part 1. This week we continue his story and profile more of his work in Grosse Pointe Park.

Along with building his own home at 1100 Berkshire, Grosse Pointe Park saw several other Willeke residences designed in 1922. The first was located across the road from his home at 1103 Berkshire; the second was located at 938 Balfour (which features a stunning band of iridescent Pewabic tile along the front and sides – the house was sold in 1923 for $52,000), while a further commission was for a new home at 1030 Balfour. Read more

Historical Architecture of Grosse Pointe – Architect Leonard B. Willeke and his work in Grosse Pointe Park – Part 1.

Historical Architecture of Grosse Pointe – Architect Leonard B. Willeke and his work in Grosse Pointe Park – Part 1.

One of the unsung hero’s of architecture in Grosse Pointe is Leonard B. Willeke

WillekeLeonard B. Willeke was one of the most adaptable and prolific architects to work in the Detroit area. He was an extremely versatile designer, capable of creating a house, a piece of furniture, a car or a layout/plan for an entire community; he was an incredibly gifted individual. One might say, an unrecognized champion in his contribution in providing Grosse Pointe with some of its more uniquely designed homes.

Willeke was born in Cincinnati in 1889. He began his architectural career at the age of seventeen as an apprentice with a local firm. In 1905 Willeke moved to New York to work for the prestigious of Trowbridge and Livingston as a designer. His talent was quickly rewarded for in 1906 he was asked to relocate to San Francisco to work on a new contract that had just been awarded to the firm. When work on the new hotel was completed (in late 1907) Willeke stayed on the west coast and joined the California State Engineers office to design earthquake resistant buildings.

1908 saw Willeke move to Paris to continue his education at the famed Paris École des Beaux-Arts. During his two-year stay he traveled extensively through Europe, North Africa and England, making sketches and banking many ideas that he would use throughout his career.

On his return to the United States, Willeke went home to Cincinnati working for two years at a firm specializing in fine residential design. This was followed by a stint as chief architect for a firm specializing in large commercial buildings and expensive residential work in Ohio and concluding with a move to Detroit as an associate architect for Detroit firm Elmore R. Dunlap in 1914. Read more