Historical Architecture of Grosse Pointe – The Albert Kahn Projects in Grosse Pointe Shores

Last week we profiled the magnificent Mrs. Henry Stephens Estate – formerly located at 241 Lake Shore. Completed in 1913 by nationally recognized architect Charles Platt, it was one of the grand homes that helped transform the face of Lake Shore – from seasonal summer cottages to magnificent properties for some of Detroit’s wealthiest families.

We continue with the ‘grand homes on Lake Shore’ theme this week with an exploration of five superb buildings constructed in Grosse Pointe Shores by legendary architect Albert Kahn.

Kahn’s first project in Grosse Pointe Shores was in 1910 at 880 Lake Shore – the Italian Renaissance inspired 8,403 sq ft residence for C. Goodloe Edgar, president of Edgar Sugar House, dealers in sugar and molasses. W. Hawkins Ferry, in The Buildings of Detroit, highlights the Italian Renaissance influences in the home to that of Charles Platt’s design for Alger House, (now the Grosse Pointe War Memorial) also completed in 1910.

According to W. Hawkins Ferry ‘Albert Kahn was a great admirer of the work of Charles Platt, and it is believed Kahn recommended Platt to the Alger family as the architect to create their Italian Inspired residence on the lake’. So it would come as no surprise if Platt’s work proved to be a source of inspiration for Kahn’s own project at 880 Lake Shore.

It is a striking home. As the photo below demonstrates the rear elevation is filled with an abundance of windows, archways and terraces, providing a perfect view of the lake – with just a hint of the Grosse Pointe War Memorial about it. The Italian Renaissance style was a popular architectural approach in the community during this era.

C. Goodloe Edgar Home – Courtesy of the The Legacy of Albert Kahn, by Albert Kahn

C. Goodloe Edgar Home – Courtesy of the book – The Village of Grosse Pointe Shores, By Arthur M. Woodford and Albert Kahn Associates

Kahn, also in 1910, completed the striking home for Howard E. Coffin. Born in 1873 Mr. Coffin was an automobile engineer and industrialist. Along with Roy Chapin, he was one of the founders of the Hudson Car Company, and designed many of the company’s early models. He was also known, in automotive circles, as the ‘Father of Standardization’, a result of his initiative to standardize material and design specifications, and for arranging automobile manufacturers to share their patents. Source Wikipedia.

Coffin was a millionaire by the age of 30. The house he commissioned Kahn to design for him on Lake Shore is superb testament to Kahn’s skill in creating a myriad of architectural styles. Given the home he created for C. Goodloe Edgar (that same year), was in an Italian Renaissance style approach, the home he designed for Coffin was one of his more traditional residential masterpieces.

Howard E. Coffin Home – Courtesy of the book – The Village of Grosse Pointe Shores, By Arthur M. Woodford and Albert Kahn Associates

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Historical Architecture of Grosse Pointe – Welcome to 781 Lake Shore

In amongst the many historic homes on Lake Shore there are a few mid century modern residences.

During the 1950’s/1960’s – a period when the popularity of mid century modern architecture was arguably at its peak – Lake Shore welcomed several new homes in this distinctive architectural style. We recently covered 906 Lake Shore – built in 1954 this home was one of the earlier mid century modern homes to be constructed in the area, and it is a superb example of this design approach. You can read the full story by clicking here.

Ten years later, in 1964, a new addition to the modern collection was completed – 874 Lake Shore. William Hawkins Ferry, a key figure in bringing modernist art and architecture to the attention of people in Detroit and the U.S, commissioned fellow Modernist architect William Kessler to build an international style villa, to reflect his love of modernism. It was a unique collaboration between two very influential men. You can read the full story by clicking here.

That same year another contemporary home was added to the collection – 781 Lake Shore. This unique 3,090 sq ft home displays all the key features that make this style so distinctive – an understated look, melding clean lines, gentle organic curves, along with the coming together of numerous, and sometimes contrasting materials.

781 Lake Shore, unlike its mid century modern neighbors, is slightly different in its approach. Where as the previous two homes were quite box like in their appearance the predominantly rectangular front elevation of this residence is broken up with a dominant triangular section to create a rather individual architectural statement to the entrance.

Based on our records from 1980 we can introduce you to many stunning interior features that are part of this one of a kind quad-level home. It was custom designed and built for the original owner. The entrance hall features a white Italian marble floor and a cathedral ceiling. Possibly one of the most unique additions to this home is the sunken fishpond with Hawaiian volcanic rock and cascading waterfall that is also present in the area.

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Historical Architecture of Grosse Pointe – The Many Faces of Albert Kahn

Several of the architects who created residential work in Grosse Pointe also worked in commercial, industrial and municipal architecture. Albert Kahn was not only capable of working in all these different disciplines, but he was indeed world renowned for some of his innovations.

There are numerous other architects who were as equally diverse, however what makes Kahn almost unique in the world is that he had a separate design language for each type of building – he created modern/ground breaking industrial designs, was open to following the latest trends for his commercial projects, and developed very traditional residences. In a limited group of architects who possessed these skills this makes him quite remarkable.

Kahn’s early career was dominated by residential projects. He then ventured into commercial buildings, added factories to his repertoire, whilst continuing to work on many grand homes throughout Metro Detroit, albeit in a more limited capacity.

In 1894, whilst working as a draftsman for Mason and Rice, Kahn was part of the team who were asked to create the new offices for Hiram Walker and Sons in Windsor, Ontario. One year later, in 1895, at the age of 26, he founded the architectural firm of Albert Kahn Associates. In 1901 he had completed his first industrial project – the Boyer Machine Company in Detroit is the first industrial building attributed to Kahn. Source: The Legacy of Albert Kahn by W. Hawkins Ferry.

In 1903 Kahn was hired to build a new automotive plant for the Packard Motor Company. A contemporary magazine at the time praised Kahn’s design as a new style of factory, bright, clean and cheerful.

The first nine buildings of the plant were of conventional mill construction. Kahn, realized the system could be a fire hazard, and so for the design of building number 10 (in 1905) he switched to the system of reinforced concrete that his brother had perfected – the first of its kind in Detroit. ‘The “Kahn” system soon became established and popular throughout the country’. Source: The Legacy of Albert Kahn by W. Hawkins Ferry.

Packard Plant’s building number 10 during expansion circa 1911 – courtesy of Wikipedia.

Over the next few years Kahn threw himself into industrial design, creating numerous factories for the ever-expanding automobile companies – including the Ford Motor Company Highland Park Plant. This left him with a limited about of time for residential projects which he reserved for a few select clients.

By 1910, his work fell into several defined styles – his industrial work was innovative and groundbreaking, his commercial work was commanding attention for its ‘simplicity and excellence’, while his residential projects were grand traditional masterpieces.

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Historical Architecture of Grosse Pointe – 906 Lake Shore

Many houses on Lake Shore are somewhat of an enigma, grand homes, hidden by a shield of trees and located away from the road – it takes a vivid imagination to envision what they are like.

There is a wonderful blend of the old and the new – the grand mansions built at the beginning of the 20th century, and the mid century modern homes that present us with a glimpse into a unique architectural style that remains popular in Grosse Pointe.

The Pointes feature a number of modern buildings, which are the work of many artists who lead the way in popularizing modern design, including: the Grosse Pointe Central Library (Marcel Breuer); 203 Cloverly (The Saarinen’s); the 3 residences by Alden Dow, along with the modern home created by William Kessler – located at 874 Lakeshore.

It is the modern style that we focus on today as we introduce you to 906 Lake Shore.

Built in 1954, this 3,692 sq ft house is located on the shores of Lake St. Clair. During a period when the popularity of mid century modern architecture was arguably at its peak, the design displays the key features that make this style so distinctive – an understated look, melding clean lines, gentle organic curves, the coming together of numerous, and sometimes contrasting materials.

The pure white clay brick of 906 Lake Shore enhances the unique appearance of this house. According to our files, this was the first house in Grosse Pointe to use this material, with each brick being hand chipped on all exposed surfaces.

The front curved terrace, expanded stair area and entrance planting area are all faced in brick and topped with Indiana limestone.

The interior of the house features high ceilings and incorporates several unusual finishes. The majority of the wood throughout the house is natural-finished mahogany, selected to give a tropical effect. Mahogany wood paneling is present on the living room and living terrace ceiling, along the hallways and in the study area.

The 12 Shoji doors and 5 windows were imported from Japan. The floor to ceiling windows on the rear elevation measure 11’ x 6’, weigh 800 lbs, and provide a magnificent abundance of natural light – always an integral component to this architectural style.

Floor to ceiling windows on the rear elevation – courtesy of Realtor.com

As is the case with so many mid century modern homes, the house is filled with many planned built-in storage areas – magazine shelves and storage drawers in the reception area, a hobby storage cabinet in the living room, built in music area, cabinets for shoes and clothes in the bedrooms, while the kitchen features an array of multi purpose cabinets and storage options to ensure clean lines and a minimalist feel can be maintained.

Intricate wooden detailing is present throughout – cane paneling in the living room, woven wood tapestry in the guest room, and custom made natural walnut wood shutters in the housekeeper’s room.

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Historical Architecture of Grosse Pointe – The Old and the New: Sunningdale – Part 2

When you drive up a road in Grosse Pointe, frequently you cant help but stop and look at the houses on display. One day, having been driving around the Pointes, we found ourselves on Sunningdale Drive. Aside from the pristine gardens on display the diversity of the architecture captured our attention.

While it was obvious some homes are much older than others, it also quickly became apparent the newer houses on the street had been designed to respect their ‘elderly’ neighbors.

Assembling a collection of architectural styles is never easy – arguably homes constructed during the past 30 years do not resemble the homes from a by-gone era – namely the 1920’s and 1930’s. However, there are exceptions, which is evident in the modern constructions on this street.

Welcome to part two of our presentation on Sunningdale. Last week we covered the homes completed before 1940, this week we turn our attention to the later creations.

Lets start with number 717. This is the second home on the street by distinguished architect Marcus Burrows. Having completed number 942 in 1926, this 2,960 sq ft clapboard colonial house is a significant departure from Burrows typical brick built English Revival Style residences. It is a particularly striking house with the four dominant porticos on the front elevation and the delicate arches below the roofline. It not only demonstrates Burrows diversity as an architect but the streets evolving architectural style.

717 Sunningdale

Number 87 was completed in 1942 and is a pretty Cape Cod style home. The Cape Cod Style is present throughout the Pointes and became increasing popular during the 1940’s and onwards.

87 Sunningdale

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Historical Architecture of Grosse Pointe – The Old and the New: Sunningdale – Part 1

Regular readers to our blog will know over the past few months we have profiled numerous streets around the Pointes – covering their history, many of the wonderful homes, along with the noted architects who worked on these respective roads. We have featured several prestigious roads in the Farms, along with some prominent streets in the Park and the City.

This week we turn our attention to Grosse Pointe Shores, and the old and the new homes we find on the distinguished street of Sunningdale.

Sunningdale, like so many streets in the community, is one without a definitive architectural style, which makes it interesting. There is the collection of homes built prior to 1940, a range of homes that were built around the 1950’s (a period of extensive growth in this area), and the newer homes, built in the 2000’s – reminiscent of homes from a by-gone era.

In Part 1 of our Sunningdale presentation we profile some of the older homes built before 1940.

Lets start with one of the older homes on the street, number 80, built in 1926. This Handsome English Tudor with its distinctive triangular features, and intricate brickwork is around 5,000 sq ft. Over the decades English Tudor homes became a particular popular style on Sunningdale and were continuing to be built well into the 1950’s.

80 Sunningdale

80 Sunningdale

Also built in 1926 is number 942. It was designed by one of the most talented and versatile architects to work in Grosse Pointe Marcus Burrowes. During his career Burrows designed over 1000 buildings in and near Detroit, including residential, public and municipal projects. You can read his full story by clicking here.

942 Sunningdale

In 1920 Burrowes joined forces with Frank Eurich (a graduate from Cornell University) and together they designed over 10 homes in Grosse Pointe. During this era Burrowes was widely known throughout southeast Michigan for his English Revival Style buildings, an approach he also brought to the Grosse Pointe communities, including this home on Sunningdale. This 4,600 sq ft home features a grand living room (30’ x 20’), a large dining room (22’ x 18’) with a bay window, and service stairs. There are four bedrooms (the master has a natural fireplace) along with a large open 3rd floor, which, at the time could have been used as a ballroom – extremely popular during this era.

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Top Producers of 2016!

Higbie Maxon Agney congratulates the Top Producers of 2016!

Jaime Rae Turnbull, Libby Follis, Dennis Andrus, Michelle Agosta, Darlene D’Amico and Heather Adragna Ulku!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Historical Architecture of Grosse Pointe – The Modern Colonial Work of Omer C. Bouschor – Part 2

Last week we covered the Tudor work of Omer C. Bouschor. During his career, this Detroit based architect created well over 29 homes in the community – more than many other architects.

The architectural style(s) that influenced Omer C. Bouschor’s homes in Grosse Pointe could be described as be defined by two very distinctive approaches. From the residences we have presented there is a distinct shift from his Tudor Revival homes of the 1930’s, through to the modern colonial homes he created between 1935 and 1954.

This week we explore the 15 modern colonial homes he created across the Grosse Pointe communities. Given that Bouschor’s 14 Tudor inspired homes (during the 1930’s) are clearly the work of a man who was adept at one particular architectural style, it is incredible to think he could so seamlessly transition into designing handsome colonial homes.

Having worked primarily in Grosse Pointe Park during the 1930’s Bouschor, in the 1940’s, began to work in the Farms and the Shores. From the list below you will see just how many superb homes he created during this period.

1935
113 Merriweather

This is one of the earlier homes to display a change in style to his modern colonial approach. Constructed from brick, with a clapboard front on the second floor, this 3,500 sq ft home is poles apart from the Tudor homes he was predominantly creating during the 1930’s, and was possibly his first project in Grosse Pointe Farms.

113-merriweather

113 Merriweather

1936
15127 Windmill Pointe Drive

15127-wpd_realtor-com

15127 Windmill Pointe Drive – Courtesy of Realtor.com

1939
759 Berkshire

759-berkshire

759 Berkshire

1117 Bishop

1117-bishop-realtor-com

1117 Bishop – Courtesy of Realtor.com

505 Middlesex

1940
103 Vendome

103-vendome

103 Vendome

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Grosse Pointe Open Houses for this weekend – Sunday, September 25, 2016 from 2-4 p.m.

HMA has an open house this weekend—Sunday, September 25, 2016 2-4 p.m.:

Cathy Cain will be holding open 515 Shelden, Grosse Pointe Shores

This wonderful family home is located a stone’s throw from Lake St Clair and is within walking distance to Grosse Pointe Yacht Club and Shores park.  This home is offering a fenced back yard, spacious bedrooms, eat in kitchen and a large three season sun porch.   The dining room and living room have large bay windows. There are built in cabinets in dining room and family room. A curved stairwell greets you in the foyer. The home has two newer AC and furnace units. Come take a look at this house. It only needs your updating touches. This 3,622 sq. ft. home is listed for $550,000.

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For more detail please visit: http://ow.ly/xKyr304lzqP

 

We look forward to seeing you!

 

For a full list of this weekend’s Open House’s visit: http://ow.ly/OfcZr

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grosse Pointe Open Houses for this weekend – Sunday, September 18, 2016 from 2-4 p.m.

HMA has an open house this weekend—Sunday, September 18, 2016 2-4 p.m.:

Melissa Dagher Singh will be holding open 76 Vernier, Grosse Pointe Shores

Charming Farm house with warp around porch, attached garage with work room. Beautiful grounds surround the house and patio with gazebo roof. Close walking distance to Lake Shore and the lake front community park. This house shows very well, move in condition and very well maintained. House received Grosse Pointe Shores Centennial designation in 2015. This 1,722 sq. ft. home is listed for $264,900

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For more detail visit: http://ow.ly/fjjj301BQoQ

We look forward to seeing you!

 

For a full list of this weekend’s Open House’s visit: http://ow.ly/OfcZr