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Historical Architecture of Grosse Pointe – The Lost Estates – 111 Lakeshore

Lets continue with our review of the lost estates of Lakeshore. Over the past few weeks we have featured some stunning homes, most recently the William P. Stevens estate – 431 Lakeshore.

The number of mansions that have been razed over the years is astonishing. According to an article in the Detroit News (1997) ‘of the 43 estates listed in a 1956 article about mansions in the Pointes, only 13 still exist’, and since 1997, more have fallen.

This week we turn our attention to 111 Lakeshore, also known as ‘Cherryhurst’ – home of engineer, and financier Paul Harvey Deming.

111 Lakeshore was built in 1907. It was one of the first year round residences to be built in Grosse Pointe Farms. French farmers first inhabited the two-acre site along Lakeshore in the 1700’s. It was also the site of Grosse Pointe Farms’ first summer cottages, built for two wealthy Detroiters in the late 1800’s. Source: web.archive.org – mcgi.state.mi.us

The lot, as depicted by the plan below, was a long and narrow property, measuring 130 feet wide and 614 feet deep. It was reached by a private drive off of Lakeshore Road

Created in the Tudor Revival architectural style this exquisite home was a colossal 15,000 square ft three story residence built in the shape of a U. Source: www.revolvy.com. It features many of the defining characteristics found in Tudor revival homes such as decorative half timbering, a steeply pitched roof, long rows of casement windows, stucco on the exterior along with half timbering on the exterior of the second floor.

Cherryhurst – Courtesy of web.archive.org – mcgi.state.mi.us

The interior also reflects this popular architectural style with detailed woodwork, paneling and archways present in many of the rooms. The property featured 10 fireplaces, many of which were carved limestone. The spectacular 29’ x 23’ sq ft entrance hall is paneled with beech (as depicted in the photo below).

Cherryhurst Interior – Courtesy of web.archive.org – mcgi.state.mi.us

There were several grand rooms on the first floor, including the 20’ x 35’ sq ft living room, the 24’ x 18’ sq ft dining room, a large 22’ x 18’ sq ft kitchen, along with an extravagant 43’ x 25’ sq ft ballroom.

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