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Historical Architecture of Grosse Pointe – The Work Of Bloodgood Tuttle.

Having spent the past two weeks exploring two sublime homes on Woodland Place – 2 Woodland Place, and 7 Woodland Place – we now turn our attention to an architect we haven’t featured before – Bloodgood Tuttle.

Bloodgood Tuttle may not have been a prolific architect in Grosse Pointe, but he was an architect who had a stellar reputation across several states. Many such architects, who have created very few homes in our community, had worked on a large number of projects throughout the United States, and given their prominence we are rather fortunate to have some of their work on display.

Born in 1889 Tuttle was originally from Cleveland. He graduated from the University of Chicago and continued his architectural studies at the Beaux Arts in Paris. On his return to the United States Tuttle established himself in Detroit, but also practiced far and wide.

During the 1920’s he had gained a first-rate reputation for the stately residences he had created in Shaker Heights, Ohio. He was one of the best-known architects in the area, designing 36 homes. The images below are a few examples of Tuttle’s projects in Shaker Heights. Source: clevelandhistorical.org

Despite spending much of his time in Ohio Tuttle also continued to practice in Detroit and throughout the State of Michigan. His designs crossed several architectural styles, ranging from Tudor, French Châteaux through to Dutch Colonial and English manor style.

Tuttle worked primarily on residential projects, but also welcomed commercial commissions. One of his more noted projects in Michigan was the Midland County Court House, completed in 1926. Tuttle designed the building in a rustic Tudor Revival style, mainly to adhere to the style of other public buildings in the state and, indeed, the nation. The design was also, in part, influenced by a request from Herbert H. Dow, founder of the Dow Chemical Company, who had provided additional funds and materials for the build.

Midland County Courthouse – Courtesy of waymaking.com

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