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Historical Architecture of Grosse Pointe – Welcome to Lakeland – Part 3 (1928 – 1955)

Welcome to part three of our Lakeland exploration in Grosse Pointe City. Over the past couple of weeks we have investigated some fabulous homes. Part one explored several residences completed between 1909 and 1924, while part two presented numerous houses constructed between 1924 and 1927.

Lakeland has a wonderfully diverse selection of architectural styles that have evolved during a period of significant growth in the Grosse Pointes. We are fortunate enough to be able to see the transition that is so clearly evident on this street – from the grand 12,000 sq ft Georgian home created for John M. Dwyer in 1909, to the exquisite French provincial residence completed in 1927, through to the modern colonial home completed in 1955.

We begin our final review of Lakeland with number 340, completed in 1928. Crombie and Stanton, who had completed number 355 Lakeland the previous year, designed it for Arthur B. McGraw.

Built on a large 1.14-Acre lot the stunning English manor house is a brick construction, with slate roof, and 3 stunning interlocking brick chimneys on the front elevation. The front of the 3-storey home features a magnificent bay window, and a wonderfully detailed front entrance with five rows of brick set within a step formation leading to the front door. The large windows result in huge amounts of light flooding each room, thus emphasizing the magnificent architectural detailing that includes a dragon holding a compass in its talons on the textured ceiling in the living room.

In 1933 two bedrooms and a bathroom for the maids were added to the first floor, along with a bedroom suite on the second floor.

340 Lakeland – Courtesy of Grosse Pointe Historical Society

340 Lakeland

Completed in 1929 is number 315. This magnificent 7,274 sq ft Tudor residence was designed by one of Detroit’s most significant architects George D. Mason. As renowned Detroit historian Clarence M. Burton once wrote, quite simple George DeWitt Mason was “the dean of Detroit architects”.

315 Lakeland

315 Lakeland

 

With a career spanning over 50 years Mason created many historic buildings in and around the city, along with several superb homes in Grosse Pointe. Over a period of 21 years he designed 10 homes in the community – grand structures, very distinctive style, with individual personalities. You can read his full story in by clicking here – part 1; part 2; and part 3.

Also finished in 1929 is house number 521 – a 3,179 sq ft Colonial residence. Hilary Micou, who constructed an enormous amount of homes in the Grosse Pointes, built it. Many of his properties span several decades – from the late 1920’s through to the late 1950’s. This is quite possibly one of his earliest projects in the community.

521 Lakeland

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Historical Architecture of Grosse Pointe – Welcome to Lakeland – Part 2 (1924 – 1927)

Last week we introduced you to the distinguished street of Lakeland (Part 1), and its array of architecturally significant homes created between 1909 and 1924 by a range of talented designers.

This week we continue our exploration as we reveal some of the homes constructed between 1924 and 1927. There are some wonderful works of art, compiling a rich collection of differing architectural approaches.

Lets start with number 411, completed in 1924, by the noted firm of Maul and Lentz. It is a striking 4,882 sq ft brick home with exquisite limestone detailing on the front elevation. The interior features high ceilings, a marble floored foyer, a beautiful wood paneled library along with seven spacious bedrooms. The home was built for Dr. Thaddeus Walker (1870-1939), who was a prominent physician in Detroit.

411 Lakeland – Courtesy of Grosse Pointe Historical Society

411 Lakeland

Walter Maul and Walter Lentz also designed 1007 Bishop Road, Grosse Pointe Park – one of the largest lots on the street. Maul and Lentz, the previous partners of – Walter MacFarlane, both graduated from University of Michigan. Together they designed many historic homes in Indian Village, and the affluent suburbs of Metro Detroit during this era.

John W Case designed number 455 in the same year, 1924. It is 4,494 sq ft and created in a Spanish architectural style with a white stucco exterior and terracotta tiles on the roof – popular in Grosse Pointe during this era.

455 Lakeland – Courtesy of Grosse Pointe Historical Society

Also completed in 1924, is number 430, a splendid 2,848 sq ft brick residence designed by Lancelot Sukert. This architect was a key advocate of the arts and crafts movement in the city during this era. One of Sukert’s more noted projects was the Scarab Club. Completed in 1928 it is an artist’s club, gallery and studio in Detroit’s Cultural Center. It was designated a Michigan State Historic Site in 1974 and listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1979. Source: Wikipedia.

430 Lakeland

Completed in 1925, number 440 is a Tudor style home designed by Murphy and Burns.

440 Lakeland – Courtesy of Grosse Pointe Historical Society

The Detroit based firm were also responsible for the Graphic Arts Building in 1928. Located at 41-47 Burroughs, the 50,000 sq ft, four-story Italian Romanesque style building (the façade is faced with cream-colored terra cotta) was created to house individuals and businesses associated with the graphic arts.

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Historical Architecture of Grosse Pointe – Welcome to Lakeland (1909 – 1924)

Over the past couple of weeks we have presented you with the history of the golf course at the Country Club of Detroit, along with a superb mid century modern home located at 906 Lake Shore.

This week, in the first of a three part series, we return to profiling one of the distinguished streets in the community, and its array of architecturally significant homes – welcome to Lakeland, in Grosse Pointe City.

The homes on Lakeland span a multitude of decades – from the beginning of the 20th century through to the 1950’s and beyond. As you can imagine the architectural styles vary a great deal, which provides us with an exciting collection of designs to explore. A talented range of designers who have worked on a substantial number of residences across the Grosse Pointe communities during their respective careers created the homes.

Lets start with possibly the oldest, and largest house on the street number 372. The house was built for John M. Dwyer in 1909. At just under 12,000 Square feet, it is one of the largest residences in Grosse Pointe, and one of the finest examples of Georgian architecture in the community. It was designed by Boston architect George Hunt Ingraham who worked in Detroit for a limited number of years from 1907 – 1910 (we believe).

372 Lakeland – courtesy of google.com

372 Lakeland – courtesy of Grosse Pointe Historical Society

The estate, surrounded by a lush formal garden, originally sat across what is now Lakeland Avenue. When the property was constructed a brick wall swept around the entire block from Jefferson to Maumee, and the property was encased by a stunning garden, including a tennis court on the side yard lawn.

372 Lakeland – courtesy of Grosse Pointe Historical Society

At some point in the history of the home, and it is not clear when, the land was sub divided and bisected by Lakeland Avenue. The gigantic Georgian Mansion was moved approximately 100’ and rotated 90 degrees to face Lakeland Avenue, where it still stands.

The house itself became 372 Lakeland, the carriage house now has the address of 17330 Maumee, while the guesthouse became 382 Lakeland. The original wall and iron gates that were part of the original estate still remain and are located on the piece of land at the corner of Lakeland and Maumee.

House number 266 is one of the fabulous Albert Kahn homes that can be found in the community. Built in 1912, the 5,474 sq ft home was constructed for Benjamin F. Tobin, president of Continental Motors. Tobin was one of the many auto executives who chose to locate to the thriving new community in the suburbs during the early 1900’s. The English Tudor style home features 18-rooms, and was recently awarded a bronze historic plaque by the Grosse Pointe Historical Society for its architectural significance to the community.

266 Lakeland – courtesy of Grosse Pointe Historical Society

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