Posts

Historical Architecture of Grosse Pointe – Cottage Hospital Nurses’ Residence

Last week we explored several of the sublime houses on Ridge Road, Grosse Pointe Farms. This week, we stay on Ridge Road and visit the Cottage Hospital Nurses Residence – now home to the Services for Older Citizens (SOC).

The building, located at 158 Ridge Road, was originally built for the newly constructed Cottage Hospital as a nurse’s residence. Cottage Hospital (now the Henry Ford Medical Center) was built in 1928 and was designed by the renowned firm of Stratton and Snyder.

Cottage Hospital – Courtesy of The Village of Grosse Pointe Shores By Arthur M. Woodford

The nurses’ residence, a separate building from the hospital, was the brainchild of Helen Hall Newberry Joy – daughter of Helen Handy Newberry and John Stoughton Newberry, and wife of Henry Bourne Joy. Ms. Newberry donated the funds so the dormitory could be built for the 20 nurses who would reside there at any one time. A grand opening took place in June 1930, and the residence became known as Newberry House.

The superb 10,000 sq ft three-story residence is a superb Georgian Colonial style design. Its symmetrical design, intricate brickwork, and perfect proportions is down to the creative skills of architect Raymond Carey.

Cottage Hospital Nurses Residence

Raymond Carey was a prominent architect in Grosse Pointe Farms, designing many luxurious homes during the era of substantial growth in the community.

Raymond Marwood-Elton Carey was born in England in 1883; he grew up in Bath surrounded by some of the finest examples of Georgian Architecture in the world, most of which still exist today. These Eighteenth Century architectural works of art made a huge impression on Carey and during his career he would design some of Grosse Pointe’s finest Georgian Homes.

Having graduated from the University of Bath, he arrived in Detroit at the beginning of the 20th Century. The city would be his home for just a few years. In 1909 he created what is arguably his finest Georgian masterpiece, the John M. Dwyer House, located at 372 Lakeland.

Shortly after completing the Dwyer House Carey relocated to Winnipeg, Manitoba. However, by the mid-1920’s Carey had returned to Detroit. During his second stint in the city Carey’s work began to become extremely sought after and he became a key figure in creating Georgian style homes. His work helped transform the architectural scene in Grosse Pointe Farms, through the golden era for Georgian design. Within 20 years he had created at least 12 homes (that we know of). You can read the full story of Raymond Carey by clicking here.

Read more

Historical Architecture of Grosse Pointe – 234 Provencal

We recently presented the homes Raymond Carey designed on Provencal, Grosse Pointe Farms. The spectacular residences he created on this prestigious street vary dramatically in size, ranging from the 6,779 sq ft located at 380 Provencal through to one of Grosse Pointes largest homes – 194 Provencal which is 12,185 sq ft in size.

Raymond Carey was no stranger to grand homes. Having grown up and studied architecture in England Carey was surround by the substantial town and country estates that were part of the scenery in his hometown of Bath.

In 1909 Carey left England and arrived in Winnipeg, Canada. Having worked as an architect in both Canada and for a short time in San Francisco Carey moved to Detroit in 1921-22 to open his own practice. According to research from http://dictionaryofarchitectsincanada.org/ Carey, in 1924, teamed up with Horace H. Esselstyn, an Engineer in Detroit *. Their firm Carey & Esselstyn was active from 1924 to 1929, and during this period ‘Carey produced some of the most distinctive and sumptuous residential masterpieces of his career’.

Many of the homes Carey designed in Grosse Pointe were created during this period, with the majority in his signature neo-Georgian and Tudor Revival approach.

At its height of popularity in the 1920’s, Tudor Revival residences required skill by the architect to reproduce the typical characteristics in the right proportions to display the charm associated with this style. Given Carey’s skill in this approach, and the homes he was surrounded by growing up as a child, it is not surprising this style was particularly influential in the large English Country inspired residence located at 234 Provencal.

Courtesy of the Grosse Pointe Historical Society

The home, built in 1929, is approximately 8,122 square feet and is situated on a 100’ x 560’ lot. It is constructed from solid stone with a slate roof, and has exquisite detailing across the exterior.

Read more

Historical Architecture of Grosse Pointe – The Raymond Carey Homes on Provencal

Born in England in 1883 Raymond Carey was a prominent architect in Grosse Pointe Farms. He designed many luxurious homes during the 1920’s – 1930’s, an era of substantial growth in the community.

Having grown up and studied architecture in Bath, England, Carey had been surrounded by some of the finest Georgian residences in the world. This level of inspiration influenced much of Carey’s work, particularly here in Grosse Pointe.

Raymond Carey arrived in Winnipeg, Canada at the beginning of the 20th Century. By the early 1920’s Carey had relocated to Detroit. He had become a key figure in creating fine Georgian style homes, and his work had become extremely sought after.

Throughout Grosse Pointe the 1920’s were a golden era for Georgian design. Carey created at least 15 homes in the community (that we know of), including several prestigious homes on Provencal, along with the Cottage Hospital Nurse’s House, in 1929, located at 150 Ridge Road.

Carey was particularly adept to designing large homes, which is certainly evident in the homes he created on Provencal, which includes:

  • 338 Provencal – 1928 – 10,304 sq ft
  • 380 Provencal – 1929 – 6,779 sq ft
  • 234 Provencal – 1929 – 8,122 sq ft
  • 390 Provencal – 1931 – 10,000 sq ft
  • 194 Provencal 1931 – 12,185 sq ft

Lets start with the largest of his Provencal projects – number 194.

194 Provencal was built, in 1931, for Earl Holley, former chairman of the Holley Carburetor Company of Detroit. The 12,185 sq ft home has particularly handsome detailing including Corinthian pilasters; a columned entrance flanked by two large curved bow windows. It is a fantastic example of Georgian architecture and at 12,185 sq ft it is one of the largest homes in Grosse Pointe.

194 Provencal – courtesy of Detroityes.com

Read more

Historical Architecture of Grosse Pointe – Welcome to Kenwood Road – The Designers’ Collection: Part 1

Throughout our series of blog posts we regularly focus on the history of specific homes, profile individual designers and explore interesting roads.

This week we focus on the latter with an exploration of the first block of Kenwood Road, Grosse Pointe Farms, and its designer’s collection of beautifully crafted houses.

There are many roads in Grosse Pointe that have an abundance of homes created by some of Detroit’s most prominent architects – Bishop, Cloverly, Edgemont Park and Vendome being prime examples.

Kenwood is up there with the best of them, and may even lay claim to having the largest collection of homes – on one block – by the leading architectural talent of the 1920’s. With a road of such prominence we decided to separate the story of Kenwood Road into two parts starting with the homes created by the two most active architects on the block, Robert O. Derrick and Raymond Carey. Part 2 will explore the remaining houses generated by some equally talented designer’s.

The houses on Kenwood present an array of architectural styles, from Colonial Revival, Cotswold and Tudor through to French provincial.

Like so many of these prestigious streets, the beauty is in the details. As you head from Grosse Pointe Blvd and make your way towards Kercheval, many of these homes exhibit charming features, including the intricate brickwork on the chimney of house number 60, the superb classic Tudor entrance of house number 110, the fun weather vain at house number 90 and the decorative element on the pediment of number 63.

60 Kenwood_detail 110 Kenwood_entrance   Weather Vain  63 Kenwood

We begin our exploration of Kenwood with a look at the work of Robert O.Derrick, and the four homes he created – the largest contribution of any architect on the block.

Read more

Historical Architecture of Grosse Pointe – From Across The Pond.

For the next few weeks, historical architecture of Grosse Pointe is going on the road and heading to England, home of cottages, castles, warm beer and many wonderful buildings and gardens.

HMA_England

Grosse Pointe architecture has many important ties with the United Kingdom. Several of the prominent architects that have worked in the area spent some time either training or traveling in the UK, including Albert Kahn, Hugh T. Keyes, Leonard B. Willeke and English architect Raymond Carey with his superb Georgian style homes. Together they designed at least 80 buildings in the community, with the majority of their projects still around today.

It wasn’t just the architects that made the journey across the pond, many of the grand mansions in Grosse Pointe have or had some components brought over from the United Kingdom. This includes the 600-year-old yew hedges for Roy D. Chapin and his garden at 447 Lake Shore, along with the 150-year-old boxwoods located at Rose Terrace.

The English Renaissance “castle” also known as Stonehurst – built in 1917 – featured a music room lined with oak paneling that had been removed from a stately home and reassembled at Stonehurst at a reputed cost of $100,000. The Ralph Harmon Booth home, located at 315 Washington features a 15’ high slate fireplace from an English estate along with a fireplace and walnut paneling imported from a prominent residence. We have the quaint English style cottage hidden amongst the trees – 1017 Lake Shore, and of course the Edsel and Eleanor Ford House known for its traditional Cotswold style. Many components of the home resemble the traditional rural cottages found in the Cotswold’s, in particular the customary style slate roof, which features on many homes throughout Grosse Pointe.

We hope you enjoy our stories from England, we will be featuring: a home you all know and love, a fabulous garden, and a palace fit for a king.

The series will begin tomorrow (Wednesday July 22nd) when HMA goes to Downton Abbey!

 

Written by Katie Doelle
© 2015 Higbie Maxon Agney

 

Historical Architecture of Grosse Pointe – the John M. Dwyer house – 372 Lakeland.

Last week we introduced you to English architect Raymond Carey and his magnificent Georgian Homes around Grosse Pointe. One house in particular, 372 Lakeland caused quite the debate. There was a discussion that Carey might not have been the architect after all and the design of the home should be attributed to George Hunt Ingraham, an architect from Boston who worked in Detroit for a few years.

372 lakeland

 

372 Lakeland_1

We took our story to the wonderful team at the Grosse Pointe Historical Society to see if they could shed further light on the designer of the home. Despite their extensive files and many photo’s we could not get a definitive answer as to Carey’s involvement. But this did prove one thing, which is how lucky we are to have such a superb Historical Society here in Grosse Pointe, and without them we wouldn’t have gotten this far with our story of 372 Lakeland, a house that has a very interesting tale to tell.

The house located at 372 Lakeland was built for John M. Dwyer in 1909. At just under 12,000 Square feet, it is one of the largest homes in Grosse Pointe, and one of the finest examples of Georgian architecture in the community.

photo 1

Photo courtesy of the Grosse Pointe Historical Society

Back in the mid 19th century Detroit was the stove capital of the world. The city had four large stove manufactures producing more than ten percent of the stoves sold around the world at the time. The Dwyer brothers, Jeremiah and James, founded three of the four companies. John M. Dwyer, son of Jeremiah and nephew of James, was the vice president of the Peninsula Stove Company.

Read more

Historical Architecture of Grosse Pointe – An Englishman in Grosse Pointe – Raymond Carey

Raymond Carey was a prominent architect in Grosse Pointe Farms, designing many luxurious homes during the era of substantial growth in the community. His name however is probably alien to many people.

Raymond Marwood-Elton Carey was born in England in 1883, he grew up in Bath surrounded by some of the finest examples of Georgian Architecture in the world, most of which still exist today. These Eighteenth Century architectural works of art made a huge impression on Carey and during his career he would design some of Grosse Pointe’s finest Georgian Homes.

Carey graduated from the University of Bath, it is not clear when he left the country; he arrived in Detroit at the beginning of the 20th Century. The city would be his home for just a few years, and in 1909 he created what is arguably his finest Georgian masterpiece, the John M. Dwyer House, located at 372 Lakeland.

372 lakeland

After completing the home for Mr. Dwyer, Carey relocated to Winnipeg, Manitoba where he would marry Dorothy Heubach. In 1910 Carey formed a partnership with John Woodman, which lasted until 1917. His next move was to establish a firm with prominent Winnipeg architect George Northwood, however the partnership lasted barely four years and by the mid-1920’s Carey had returned to Detroit.

Raymond Carey Home

Carey’s home in Winnipeg, built in 1915

Read more